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15/05/18
A new study has revealed women who go through the menopause later than the average woman, have a much lower risk of developing
dementia.

Although the difference in memory is fairly small, the results do still show the menopause could play a key role in lowering the risk of dementia. More in-depth research will need to be carried out to determine the full link between the menopause and memory, but these initial findings are certainly interesting.

Here, we’ll look at what the study found, along with key things to look out for to detect whether or not you’re on the verge of the menopause.

Understanding the menopause study

The new study was carried out by a team of researchers from the University College London. It looked into the memory of 1315 British women between the ages of 43-69. There were 846 women involved in the study who went through the menopause naturally, while the others had gone through the menopause after surgery.

The team showed the women a list of 15 common words, with one being shown every second. Their job was to remember these words and then write down as many as they could remember. They repeated this test three times.

What it found, was the 846 women who had experienced natural menopause, had different results depending upon age. It revealed that for each year later that the menopause started, women could remember an average of 0.09 additional words.

Can the results be trusted?

There are a few things to keep in mind with this study. First and foremost, the differences in the results were really small. It worked out for every decade the menopause is delayed, women can remember just one extra word. So, the link between the menopause and dementia is extremely small.

On the one hand, it does provide a potential reason why dementia seems to affect more women than it does men. The theory is that oestrogen could be behind a good memory. However, the study couldn’t suggest that women who took HRT to replace Oestrogen also had a better memory. Therefore, it doesn’t appear that the hormone does link to dementia.

How to detect if you’re on the verge of the menopause

The menopause can lead to numerous health issues, especially if you go through early menopause. Therefore, it’s understandable you may want to be aware of the signs. The perimenopause signs develop months, and sometimes years before you actually experience menopause.

Though the symptoms vary among women, the most common to look out for include:
  • Mood swings
  • Irregular periods
  • Weight gain
  • Low libido

Irregular periods tend to be the very first sign. You’ll notice they start becoming less predictable, the symptoms could completely change, and you’ll also start to miss them. Mood swings are also common. Similar to those you get with PMS, mood swings associated with the menopause can be a lot more severe.

These are just some of the common menopause symptoms. However, each can also be an indicator of other potential health issues. Therefore, it’s important to seek a proper diagnosis to determine the true cause of your symptoms. Tests, such as a gynaecology scan, can help you to discover whether or not impeding menopause is the likely cause of your menstrual issues.

Clinic Team
15/05/18
Scientists have recently discovered a new way to test a baby’s gender before the typical 12-week scan. However, this exciting new discovery has caused controversy around the globe, with experts believing it could lead to an increase in gender selection.

There is a fear that parents will use the test to abort the pregnancy if it doesn’t reveal the result they were hoping for. This is especially true in countries such as China and India, where gender imbalance is currently a prevalent problem.

So, is this new test a blessing or a potential curse for parents? Below, you’ll discover more about this new test and how it matches up to an ultrasound.

Understanding the new pin-prick test

The new pin-prick test is actually similar to a new test set to be introduced on the NHS later this year. Developed by a team of Brazilian scientists, the test has proven to be accurate from as little as eight weeks into the pregnancy.

The goal the scientists were working towards, was to improve upon the existing NIPT (Non-Invasive Prenatal Test). The initial test was capable of identifying genetic conditions such as Down Syndrome. However, the new updated version is now able to detect baby’s sex.

They trialled the test on 101 pregnant women and had an impressive 100% accuracy. While this is certainly exciting as it is safer and more accurate than standard 2D 20-week ultrasound scans, there are worries it could be used for controversial purposes.

Could it encourage gender selection?

As the new test can detect gender as early as eight weeks, there is a worry it could increase the number of early abortions. The abortion cut-off is currently 24 weeks, so often parents are deterred from having an abortion if they find out baby’s gender at 20 weeks. Finding out earlier could change this, though the British Pregnancy Advisory Service claims the fears are unfounded.

At the moment, there is no real evidence to determine how many abortions are carried out for gender selection purposes. However, experts argue that there is a real possibility more couples will see the early gender reveal as an opportunity to control the sex of their baby. Not only do they predict UK based gender selection abortions will increase, but they also worry tourists will take advantage of the service too.

How it stacks up to ultrasound scans

The new pin-prick test is less invasive and doesn’t pose a danger to you or baby. The fact it could reveal the gender as early as eight weeks is also a major advantage for those who simply can’t wait to find out. However, there are a few things pregnancy ultrasound scans provide that this new test won’t.

Firstly, ultrasound scans don’t just tell you the sex, they also show you the baby. The scans can be printed off and kept forever. If you opt for a 3D or 4D scan, you can also see much more detail and even take home a video of your unborn baby. You could also potential discover hidden issues such as cysts, and other gynaecology problems.

This new test could be a great way to find out baby’s sex early on in the pregnancy. However, there is certainly a chance it could be used for the wrong purposes.

Clinic Team
15/05/18
Expectant parents have always been excited to show off their pregnancy scans. However, it seems handing friends and family a copy of the scan and pinning it on the fridge are no longer enough. Now, you need to get creative if you want to stay on-trend!
Pregnancy scans are becoming a work of art in a new bizarre, yet beautiful trend. A salon in Stockton-On-Tees has recently hit the headlines after painting an ultrasound scan onto her pregnant customer’s nails. Since the story went global, ultrasound nail art has now become very much a thing, with other pregnant women looking to get in on this exciting new trend.

So, what exactly is ultrasound nail art and what other unique ways are expectant parents choosing to announce their big news?

Ultrasound nail art

Ultrasound nail art is the newest baby reveal trend taking the world by storm. It involves painting one, or all of the nails, with the image of their ultrasound. As you can imagine, this takes quite a lot of skill! However, as salon owner Sarah Clarke proved, it’s certainly possible!

Now other salons and stylists are getting in on the trend, offering this unique service to pregnant women. The results are beautiful, though it’s obviously not as long-lasting as the ultrasound scan itself. This isn’t the only creative trend pregnant women are enjoying in 2018. Painted baby bumps are also a thing now.

What are painted baby bumps?

Painted baby bumps are a slightly more bizarre trend sweeping through the UK right now. Pregnant women commission a local artist to paint their bump, creating a little work of art.

While some are following the nail art trend and having their ultrasound scan painted onto their bump, others are opting for more unusual designs such as animals, murals and popular cartoon characters. It all started with celebrities painting their bumps, but now women across the country are following suit.

Interestingly, these baby bump art sessions are being used as a gift. While the designs do wash off, you can always take a photo of the bump, so it can be treasured forever.

3D and 4D pregnancy scans can offer great body art alternative

While ultrasound nail art and painted baby bumps are adorable and fun to create, they are only temporary. They’re also not for everyone, so what options do you have if you want a unique memory of your unborn baby without following these bizarre trends?

3D and 4D scans can prove to be an excellent alternative. They reveal details standard scans cannot pick up. 4D scans are especially worth investing in as they also give you a copy of the scan video which you can treasure forever. Unlike 2D scans, these 4D videos reveal surprising details such as baby’s chubby cheeks and features.

Overall, pregnancy scans may be becoming art, but they still can’t beat the actual scans themselves. If you’re looking for a unique way to reveal your baby to the world, 3D or 4D scans are highly recommended.
Clinic Team
15/05/18
Going for a routine pregnancy scan could reveal much more than you expected as one new mum-to-be recently discovered.
Louise Mitchell was excited to attend her 12-week scan but was shocked to discover she was growing more than her precious unborn baby inside. Doctors identified an ovarian cyst which Mitchell had no idea about. After tracking the cyst throughout the pregnancy, it was eventually removed after Mitchell gave birth. It was then that the doctors discovered the cyst was cancerous. So, her initial pregnancy scan had actually saved her life.

Many women are unaware of the hidden benefits of pregnancy scans. However, they have the ability to not only detect problems such as cysts but identify what type of cyst it is. Here, we’ll look at some of the biggest benefits of pregnancy scans and gynaecology scans.

Understanding ultrasound scans

Ultrasound scans have been used since World War II, though the method has changed dramatically over the years. They were initially designed to detect abnormalities, though are now more frequently used during pregnancy.

Today, a probe known as transducer is placed against the skin, before high-frequency ultrasound is pulsed into the body. The ultrasound waves are then reflected off the tissue, where the probe picks it up and produces an image.

Can ultrasounds be accurate at detecting cysts?

Pregnancy ultrasounds aren’t designed specifically to only detect baby. So, it is possible they can detect cysts. However, depending on the size, shape and type of the cyst growing within the body, the practitioner may not be able to pick up on the cyst if they aren’t really looking for it.
Pregnancy scans also don’t necessarily tell you which type of cyst you have if one is detected. So, accuracy wise, they can prove accurate, but it will depend upon the nature of the cyst and the experience of the practitioner carrying out the ultrasound.

Is it worth undergoing a gynaecology scan?

If you are concerned about your gynaecology health, it could be worth undergoing a specialist scan. As well as pregnancy scans, at SureScan, we offer comprehensive gynaecology scans too.

These scans can detect a wide range of abnormalities. They can be used to detect abnormal bleeding or discharge, endometriosis, fibroids, chronic pelvic pain, menstrual disorders and Polycystic ovaries to name just a few conditions. Another thing they can detect is congenital anomalies.

Congenital anomalies are known to increase the risk of miscarriages. While 2D scans can detect them, 3D scans provide a much more accurate diagnosis. 3D scans are also more accurate at pinpointing the location, size and type of issue detected, such as cysts and fibroids. The benefits of a gynaecology scan definitely make them worthwhile, whether you’re pregnant or hoping to get pregnant in the not too distant future.

So, the next time you’re heading for a pregnancy scan, you may get more than you bargained for. However, the fact pregnancy scans can detect problems such as cysts is highly beneficial. It means early treatment can be sought and the problem can be closely monitored throughout the pregnancy. In some cases, these ultrasound scans could even save your life!
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Clinic Team
27/04/18
A recent investigation has revealed that access to free fertility treatment on the NHS is now being refused to those who vape or use nicotine patches. As more health authorities adopt this policy, couples are now finding it more difficult than ever before to receive fertility treatment.

Here, we’ll look at why couples are being refused fertility treatment on the NHS if they vape and what options are available.

Could it simply be a cost-cutting move?

The survey carried out for The Mail on Sunday, revealed 16 NHS authorities have started restricting fertility treatment for those who vape or use nicotine patches. These authorities are also referred to as Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs).

The reason behind the restriction is said to be in place because any amount of nicotine can be harmful during pregnancy. However, some question whether it could simply be a cost-cutting move for the NHS. The results of the investigation come only days after GPs were advised to start informing their patients that vaping is healthier than smoking, by Public Health England.

The impact of vaping on fertility

As it stands, there is currently very little evidence to show whether or not vaping can impact fertility. However, some studies have shown that vaping can cause potential fertility issues in men. In a very small trial, samples were taken from 30 men and it showed those with high concentrations of flavourings had slower-moving sperm.

Some experts are also concerned the new policy could send out the wrong message to women. It could make them feel like switching from smoking to vaping isn’t a healthier option, when in fact it could be much healthier. The truth is, nobody really knows at this point, which is why restrictions are understandable.

It appears to be the lack of data available, which is causing somewhat of a postcode lottery when it comes to fertility policies. All 10 of the CCGs within Greater Manchester have adopted the policy, along with NHS West Suffolk, NHS Crawley, NHS Ipswich and North Sussex, NHS Horsham and Mid-Sussex, NHS Nene within Northamptonshire and NHS Milton Keynes.

Majority of CCGs have no plans to restrict treatment

A total of 117 CCGs were questioned in the survey and the majority (101) stated they had no e-cigarette restrictions in place. Many also had no plans to introduce them in the future. So, as it stands, the majority of couples will still be able to seek free treatment for the time being.

Those who no longer have access to NHS fertility treatment also have private fertility treatment options. IVF has advanced dramatically over the years, now boasting higher success rates than ever before.

Overall, these latest restrictions will no doubt impact many couples seeking fertility treatment. Of course, the healthiest thing to do is to quit smoking and vaping, but those who do vape do have private fertility treatment options available if they no longer qualify for free NHS treatment.
Clinic Team
22/04/18
A UK audit has revealed that the biggest cause of couples seeking fertility treatment is male infertility. In recent years, male infertility rates have increased, with poor sperm quality and mobility issues being the most common culprits.

It is estimated that 20% of men experience fertility issues in the UK, leading experts to suggest more research needs to be done to get to the root of the problem. Here, we’ll look at male infertility and the help available for couples experiencing male-related fertility issues.

What is male infertility?

There are a lot of different male infertility causes. The most common include poor sperm production, poor quality sperm, ejaculation issues and testicular damage. Each of these problems could be caused by numerous factors, including poor lifestyle choices.

Poor sperm quantity and quality can both have a significant impact on fertility. A full sperm analysis can determine the cause and ultimately the best solution moving forward.

What did the audit reveal?

The report, carried out by The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), revealed male infertility is the most common reason couples seek treatment. Around 37% of couples seeking treatment experience male infertility.

It wasn’t just male infertility rates that the audit revealed. It also showed that age is the most important factor to determine fertility treatment success rates. It also revealed sperm and donor egg treatments are becoming more popular. Exact figures showed a year-on-year increase of 6% for donor sperm and egg treatments.

It also revealed that although same-sex and single patients seeking treatment are on the rise, the majority of those seeking IVF treatment are heterosexual couples.

IVF is strongest it’s ever been

The most promising data revealed by the audit is that IVF treatment is currently the strongest it’s ever been. It’s been 40 years since the very first child was born via IVF, and figures show in 2016 the number of births recorded after 68,000 IVF treatments, was 20,000. This is a very positive statistic, highlighting just how far IVF success rates have come over the years.

The number of multiple births from IVA has decreased, making the treatment much safer than it once was. While finding out you’re expecting multiple babies through IVF can be wonderful news, unfortunately, they do come with much higher risks and complication rates.

The chair of the HFEA, Sally Cheshire CBE, says although she is delighted to see from the results that more couples are able to access fertility treatment than ever before, we also need to focus on unsuccessful births. If you consider the statistics from 2016 where there were 20,000 live births out of 68,000 treatments, you see there’s still a lot of couples who experience the heartache of unsuccessful pregnancies and births through IVF. Cheshire claims more support is needed for these couples moving forward.

Understanding the reasons behind your fertility issues is key to seeking successful treatment. Therefore, it is advisable to book a consultation with a fertility specialist to determine the best course of treatment suitable for you and/or your partner.
Clinic Team
16/04/18
Technology has provided amazing advancements in pregnancy scans over the past decade. These days, expectant parents can invest in private 3D or 4D scans, giving them a closer, more in-depth look at their growing baby.

However, these scans aren’t exactly cheap, so it’s understandable you may be wondering exactly what you’ll see if you do pay for one. Here, you’ll discover the difference between a 3D and 4D scan to help you decide whether or not it's worthwhile paying for one.

What’s the difference between 3D and 4D pregnancy scans?

The traditional scans you receive on the NHS, provide 2D images, but 3D and 4D scans are available privately. The 3D scans offer a three-dimensional look at the baby. Rather than just seeing the insides of your little one, you’ll be able to see their skin and facial features in much more detail.

4D scans offer the same 3D imaging, only they show your baby moving too, much like a video.

What can you see on the scans?

As mentioned above, 3D and 4D scans offer a much more in-depth look at your baby’s features. However, what you will actually see depends upon a number of factors.

Baby’s gestational age, how much clear fluid is surrounding them, and their position will determine the quality of the scan. The older baby is, the more you’ll be able to see. If you opt for the 4D scans, you could be able to watch your little one yawning, smiling or maybe even scratching their nose! One thing you won’t be able to see however is eye colour. No scans currently detect the colour of baby’s eyes as the colour typically changes after birth.

When is the best time to have one?

The earliest recommended time to have a 3D or 4D scan, is between 24 and 34 weeks. The features start to become more visible at 24 weeks, but 28 weeks is where you’ll see your baby looks more like they will when they’re born. If you can wait however, 30 weeks is typically the best time to have 3D or 4D scans as you’ll see much more detail.

What are the benefits of 3D and 4D scans?

There’s a lot of benefits which come from 3D and 4D scans. Most notably, you’ll get to actually see and recognise your baby. You won’t be disappointed by the quality of the scan like you may be with the blurry 2D traditional scans.

Of course, you will also see whether the baby is healthy, giving you great peace of mind. They’ll show whether there’s enough amniotic fluid, assess the blood flowing through the placenta and they can also tell you the sex of baby if you’re interested to find out.

Are there any risks?

There is a risk 3D or 4D scans could harm the baby, but only if you have too many of them. Having just one scan won’t typically be harmful but be wary of scans lasting longer than 45 minutes.

Overall, 3D and 4D scans offer a truly amazing view of your unborn baby. They can provide lifelong memories, with 4D scans typically offering a DVD copy you can watch again and again. If you can hold off, it’s definitely better to undergo these scans at 30 weeks into the pregnancy.
Clinic Team
10/04/18
The minute you discover you’re pregnant, it’s understandable you’d be excited to find out the sex. Knowing whether you’re expecting a little boy or girl can really help you to not just get better prepared, but to bond with baby too.

The trouble is, if you attempt to find out baby’s gender too early with a private scan, it could prove impossible to tell. Here, you’ll discover when the best time to find out the sex of your baby is and the things to consider before booking a gender reveal scan.

How soon can you accurately discover baby’s sex?

On the NHS, gender reveal scans are typically carried out between 18 and 21 weeks. However, private scans are available a little earlier.
The earliest recommended time to find out the sex of your baby is 16 weeks. Any earlier than this and it would not only be very difficult to detect the sex, but it could also harm your baby if you have too many scans early on in the pregnancy.

Is it a good idea to wait a little longer?

Although you can find out baby’s sex in your 16th week of pregnancy, it is advisable you wait a little longer. This is because babies develop at totally different rates to one another. So, you may attend a 16-week scan only to find the sex cannot yet be determined.

If you can, wait until at least 17 weeks and ideally 20 weeks before undergoing a gender reveal scan. That way, you know there’s an excellent chance of finding out the sex and there will be little risk to your baby.

Understanding the blood test reveal option

It is possible to determine baby’s sex via a blood test, rather than scan. However, these tend to only be given to women who have a high-risk pregnancy.

The blood tests are designed to detect potential genetic disorders. Part of the analysis of the blood tests includes looking into your baby’s chromosomes. This means, if a Y chromosome is present, the baby is most likely a boy. If there is no Y chromosome discovered, the baby is usually a girl.

Now, this is a pretty accurate test, but it’s only recommended for those with a high-risk pregnancy. The tests can be carried out at just 10 weeks of age and avoid the risks of a scan. However, if you do qualify for the blood test option, you won’t actually see the baby. So, a scan is generally preferable as you get to not only discover the gender but also see them too.

So, it is possible to discover baby’s sex at 16 weeks into the pregnancy. However, we do recommend waiting until week 17-20 if you want the best chance of discovering whether you’re having a boy or girl. If you choose to have a private scan, we also encourage avoiding the free NHS scan as too much ultrasound exposure can be harmful to the baby.
Clinic Team
09/04/18
A recent investigation has revealed that access to free fertility treatment on the NHS is now being refused to those who vape or use nicotine patches. As more health authorities adopt this policy, couples are now finding it more difficult than ever before to receive fertility treatment.

Here, we’ll look at why couples are being refused fertility treatment on the NHS if they vape and what options are available.

Could it simply be a cost-cutting move?

The survey carried out for The Mail on Sunday, revealed 16 NHS authorities have started restricting fertility treatment for those who vape or use nicotine patches. These authorities are also referred to as Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs).

The reason behind the restriction is said to be in place because any amount of nicotine can be harmful during pregnancy. However, some question whether it could simply be a cost-cutting move for the NHS. The results of the investigation come only days after GPs were advised to start informing their patients that vaping is healthier than smoking, by Public Health England.

The impact of vaping on fertility

As it stands, there is currently very little evidence to show whether or not vaping can impact fertility. However, some studies have shown that vaping can cause potential fertility issues in men. In a very small trial, samples were taken from 30 men and it showed those with high concentrations of flavourings had slower-moving sperm.

Some experts are also concerned the new policy could send out the wrong message to women. It could make them feel like switching from smoking to vaping isn’t a healthier option, when in fact it could be much healthier. The truth is, nobody really knows at this point, which is why restrictions are understandable.

It appears to be the lack of data available, which is causing somewhat of a postcode lottery when it comes to fertility policies. All 10 of the CCGs within Greater Manchester have adopted the policy, along with NHS West Suffolk, NHS Crawley, NHS Ipswich and North Sussex, NHS Horsham and Mid-Sussex, NHS Nene within Northamptonshire and NHS Milton Keynes.

Majority of CCGs have no plans to restrict treatment

A total of 117 CCGs were questioned in the survey and the majority (101) stated they had no e-cigarette restrictions in place. Many also had no plans to introduce them in the future. So, as it stands, the majority of couples will still be able to seek free treatment for the time being.

Those who no longer have access to NHS fertility treatment also have private fertility treatment options. IVF has advanced dramatically over the years, now boasting higher success rates than ever before.

Overall, these latest restrictions will no doubt impact many couples seeking fertility treatment. Of course, the healthiest thing to do is to quit smoking and vaping, but those who do vape do have private fertility treatment options available if they no longer qualify for free NHS treatment.
Clinic Team
09/04/18
A new study has revealed more women than ever before are paying to have private scans, despite also undergoing free scans on the NHS.
UK guidelines recommend women undergo two scans during their pregnancy; one at 12 weeks and the other at 20 weeks. In some cases, more may be provided if there is a concern over the health of the baby, but two is usually sufficient for healthy pregnancies. So, why are patients opting to pay for private scans on top of these free scans and could it impact baby’s health?

Study shows anxiety is driving rise in private scans

According to this new study conducted by the ChannelMum.com parenting site, a third of pregnant women in England are paying for private ultrasound scans. The reason behind the increase is said to be down to anxiety over baby’s health.

Approximately 1 in 3 pregnant women have what is being dubbed “scanxiety”, but are unaware it could be doing more harm than good. The study surveyed 2000 mums, showed 1 in 5 paid for two additional scans, while 18% paid for three or more additional scans. Most worryingly, 1 in 50 women admitted to paying for 9-10 extra ultrasound scans equating to almost one scan a month for the duration of the pregnancy.

Many of these scans are also longer than standard scans offered on the NHS, taking approximately 30 minutes or more each time. These longer scans are much riskier as they expose baby to increased levels of ultrasound. If the scans delve deeper into the abdomen, due to excess fat for example, they could be particularly harmful.

Which scans are available privately?

There are three different types of scans available privately. These include:
The visibility scan is carried out earlier than the NHS scan, taking place between 6-10 weeks. This simply checks that the pregnancy is developing as it should and can prove reassuring to those who have previously suffered a miscarriage.

The gender scan helps you to identify the gender of your baby. Typically, you can find this out during your second NHS ultrasound scan, but it’s worth noting that not all hospitals will tell you. So, the gender scan can prove useful if you can’t get an answer from your NHS healthcare provider.

Finally, the 3D and 4D scans have become really popular in recent years. They provide a unique view of your baby, with 4D scans being particularly impressive. These tend to be deeper scans lasting for longer periods of time.

Could additional scans be harmful to baby’s health?

Private scans can prove invaluable for those who are genuinely concerned about their baby’s health. An additional couple of scans are unlikely to cause any serious problems. However, patients are advised to limit the number of additional scans they undergo and avoid having them simply for the fun of it.

When used correctly, private scans can offer peace of mind and provide a unique image of baby you can keep and treasure forever.
Clinic Team